Author Topic: 3 Favourite Songs From Each Album  (Read 29769 times)

Offline geoffm

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3 Favourite Songs From Each Album
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2004, 05:52:43 PM »
Graeme
I was listening to welcome stranger in the car this morning.Never get sick of that cd.Im currently hooked on dave and jo`s backing vocals on wills blues.Quite lovely.However unless Ive missed something Dave doesnt sing "oceans of you".Is there a version somewhere sung by him?[please say yes]
Look George,partridges

Offline Urpal

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« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2004, 04:40:39 AM »
I'd also be interested to know if there are versions of the McComb penned Black Eyed Susans songs which Snarski delivers on the official releases - whilst Snarski's voice has it's merits it is a bit Erasurified for my tastes and Dave's voice wins every time for me when you compare the contributions on the records.  
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Offline Johan

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« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2004, 04:41:42 AM »
How about 'One Mechanic Town'? It doesn't really fit on TBS either, I think. I remember David saying at the time that he didn't really like it either, as it was a straightforward rock-song, quite an atypical Triffids song. I do quite like it myself, but like The Spinning Top Song, Falling Over You and Clown Prince it doesn't really fit well on TBS, which makes TBS the beautiful failure which in my mind it is.  
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Offline Prkl

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« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2004, 04:49:10 AM »
Well, I think part of TBS's charm is that it's all over the place, not a lot of songs "fit" there, but it doesn't really matter to me, since ALL the songs work by themselves. I'm sure The Triffids could have made another BSD or Calenture where everything seems to flow and fit perfectly, but where would have the fun been in that?  :)  

Offline KrieB

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« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2004, 07:01:49 PM »
Wellll...
I'm always: "Oh no...(noooo!!) There's that red pony again!"
What is it? A sacred piece of devotion? A Holy Cow...a hangoverish pink elephant...  
If you kind of know what i mean...

KrieB

(... a perpetuum mobile, the always reappearing nightmare freddy, the "Overseas telegramm" from Birkin - Gainsbourg - Deneuve - Birkin - ...)
But I must say it's a favorite unsolved issue - hobbyhorse
Throw yourself into The Triffids darling, you haven't got a chance!

Offline Urpal

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« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2004, 08:48:51 AM »
Quote
Scotty Stoneman was a hopeless drunk and died tragically early because of his own drinking not someone else's. Scotty is recognised as the Jimi Hendrix of country fiddle. I'll try to find his version of the song and post an mp3 (briefly in case I get sued). 
I still can't listen to my version of it.
I did like the version I sang with the Red Ponies of 20/20 Vision (and walkin' 'round blind).
Going back to Once A Day, apart from the great melody it has a fantastic punchline in "The only time I'll miss you at all is once a day.... every day.... all day long" - a joke with a more than slightly sad twist.

I'll keep an ear out for Stoneman and Anderson. Graham, your comment about Stoneman's death being from his own drinking not someone elses struck me as an odd aside. What did you mean?

Anyway, I'm sure we're all looking forward to that mp3 along with the one promised elsewhere - and to hearing versions of the "Evil" Red Ponies numbers some time too.

KrieB, I agree that "Red Pony" has a slightly dodgy subject matter (images of Liz Taylor in National Velvet and all those Bourgeoise associations of horse riding and my little pony gifts tend to spring to mind rather than the prairie or outback images probably intended), but the power of the song and it's delivery still keep it in the ranks of Triffids classics  - apart from anything else, it was a great song live.
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glee

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« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2004, 12:46:37 PM »
Clarence White was killed by a drunk driver as he was loading his gear into his car after a gig. Scotty could easily have been that drunk driver.  As Jerry Garcia said, "he probably died from drinking hair tonic."
I'll add to the site an article that's not strictly about Scotty but a friend of his called Buzz Busby. Scotty features heavily in this well written account of a little known country music genius, Mr Busby.
It will be added to Prose/Poetry/The List.
The Red Pony is a short story by Steinbeck or Hemingway I think.

   

Offline Johan

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« Reply #22 on: April 05, 2004, 06:32:34 PM »
Actually, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Great story, great song.
You think of everything, my dear, but you do not think of me

Offline KrieB

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« Reply #23 on: April 06, 2004, 09:13:54 AM »
Red Pony and Steinbeck do go together. (There are even pictures on the web of the ranch where the poor thing dwelled)

Fitzgerald that would be “Tender is the night”…absolutely-beautiful-heartbreaking-crymeariver-song…(as if that still needed to be mentioned)

I hope this is no overexposure but listen to “Tender is the night” and then take it double with “Dieu est un fumeur the havanes” (Gnsbrg) Some keyboardsound seems to make the same attempt at draining the tears from your eyes. Ghosttwins I would call these two songs.
You can make them triplets – and lighten it up a bit – with “The smokey life” (Cohen).
 
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glee

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« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2004, 11:08:13 AM »
Here's a link to a page that cropped up in my web usage logfile.
Study page.
So somebody's been doing a search for Red Pony and come up with our site and this lit study one. Wonder which was the right site.

Offline Urpal

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« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2004, 07:44:40 AM »
Steinbeck is one of my favourite writers, but I can't say I've read Red Pony, so there's one for the Christmas list.

Since we have entered a great American writers name drop zone I'd just like to mention Truman Capote - for no better reason than in my student days my obsession with reading his published works corresponded with my musical interest in The Triffids and, like the Triffids, cultural history does not appear to have been as kind to him as the talent deserved.  
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Offline Urpal

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« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2004, 07:58:02 AM »
....And thanks for the suggested musical sequencing suggestion, KrieB. Have to give that one a go.

That's quite a long feature you've posted on Buzz Busby, Graham, but worth a look. I've never really investigated bluegrass music, but I know Buddy Holly honed his musical talents in that scene and it seems a more untainted musical form to me than Country music generally, so a few pointers towards the better artists in the field certainly helps.

I was surprised to learn that bluegrass has a strong base in Washington DC - mind you American politics seems to be strongly influenced by hillbilly.
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glee

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« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2004, 12:28:27 PM »
Dave was a big fan of Flannery O'Connor. In fact I dragged out a collection of her essays he gave me last night and began re-reading. It begins with an account of her reasons for raising peacocks. I think her writing had something of an influence on Born Sandy.
The bluegrass coming out of DC in the late sixties was made by young bucks who outraged the established artists by amping up the music and being college educated. Del McCoury is from this time and I don't imagine Del could be too far right if Steve Earle found him agreeable. But you never know. Earl Scruggs was a bit of a liberal too but Lester Flatt would have been a big buddy of George Bush Snr. I'm sure Dubya is a fan of bluegrass.
People such as the Stanley Brothers wrote some sublime lyrics, but could also come up with a sing such as Papa Don't Whip Little Benny, in which the narrator pleads with Papa not to thrash poor little Benny within an inch of his life for using some bad words he learnt from some old wicked men. To complicate things Mama is watching this whole sorry scene from heaven. What's a single father to do?
Ralph Stanley is the voice heard in the Oh Brother.... soundtrack. Think he plays the Klan leader. It's an unearthly voice that he has.
Haven't been able to locate my cassette of Scotty Stoneman to post an example of his music but it must be around somewhere.
I haven't read The Red Pony either but I presume Dave had.
Dave's take on Red Pony:
" Began this one night in Winter 1982 whilst living in the Prince Of Wales hotel in St Kilda. Finished it backstage at the Pier Hotel, Frankston when the Triffids were supporting Uncanny X Men and Little Heroes. I guess I don't need to comment on that; the line-up speaks for itself.
The purpose of Red Pony was to make the lyrics as minimal and abstract as possible, so there was no more rational a message contained in the words than there was in the music. It was the first track we recorded with a string section. I don't think we knew exactly what we were doing. As I recall the song owes more than a little to Creedence's version of 'I Put A Spell On You'. "
And Spinning Top:
" An extremely nasty, vengeful, wired, thuggish, dusted, vomit-breathed, bragging brute.
The narrator is what I believe is currently referred to in academic circles as an unreconstructed male - that is to say, NOT a New Man. Or as Ice Cube would have it, 'Do I look like a motherfucking role model?' Nothing a speedball wouldn't fix.
My tastes in popular music (like those of my good friend Martyn P Casey) were severely re-arranged after hearing Sun D Moet's Hey Love, LL's Going Back To Cali, Schoolly D's Saturday Night, Ice T's Drama and Roxanne Shante's Bad Sister etc, etc. To this day I continue to be mystified by the ultra conservative boring bigotry of even some of my more talented Australian rock contemporaries. No, I won't name names - you know who you are."
 

Offline Urpal

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« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2004, 08:32:57 AM »
"Wise Blood" by Flannery O'Connor was made into a great movie by John Huston (one of his last movies) in the late 70s starring Brad Dourif (who first came to public attention as the young lad inmate in One Flew Over The Cuckoo's nest) and featuring the one and only Harry Dean Stanton (Paris Texas etc). It's a quirky but affecting film. I remember loving it at the time, but never got around to acquiring a DVD of it so haven't seen it since - I've probably got a video recording I made of it from the TV years ago lying around somewhere unwatched.

I bought one of Flannery O'Connor's books on the back of the impression left by the film but never got around to reading it. I expect I'd enjoy it because southern gothic writers have definitely been an influence on several of my musical heroes - And The Ass Saw The Angel, for instance, being southern gothic in extremis.

The Coen Brothers' "O Brother" was one of their films that didn't knock me over, though I found it amusing and entertaining. The best thing about it is the crazy, almost Dennis Potterish musical interludes - the numbers at the close of the film are particularly striking.
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Offline junkmale

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« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2004, 05:09:45 AM »
I really like Graham's version of 'once a Day', too. it always makes me smile. I was probably one of the drunken males calling for it, but what's wrong with that? I was so much younger...

I love 'Shell of the Man'. I had to hunt down the 'Goodbye Little Boy' EP for it. I remember seeing the Triffids once (London ULU?) and Dave introduced it by saying 'this is the best sog we'll play tonight...' (and I agreed). I agree, though, that, like 'Region Unknown', another of my faves, it suffered from a weak studio version.