Author Topic: Oh Mercy  (Read 6800 times)

Offline son of albert

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2010, 10:54:44 PM »
Yes, things are never going to be the same...

But then they never were  ;)
It's an idea some day, in my tears, my dreams...

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2010, 09:29:34 AM »
That's the kind of line you can imagine Orson Welles
saying during his bulky, tv commercial days.
  " Nashua; things are never going to be the same again but   
   then...
    (close up)they never were. (eye brows raise, eyes
     twinkle enigmatically.) CUT. PRINT.
 Orson: This is real shit, you know that?

Max

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2010, 09:54:47 AM »
Actually, given this topic is supposed to be about Triffids
covers, I DID hear what's easily the best cover of Wide
Open Road, I've ever heard by a Texan band. I could
imagine a lot of local bands ATTEMPTING to do such an
arrangement and sounding like tools. It's a bit like the
way Gram Parsons singing Wild Horses can draw blood
while the original is just Mick Jagger doing his cartoon
Southern voice. I hope this version can make it to some
inexplicable cubit of typewriting near you soon.
He's a strange fellow. Some say he killed a man in an
argument over Cary Grant's real intent at the end of
Suspicion. The Alfred Hitchcock film. Some say he's the
younger brother of Tin Tin, an embittered, disolute Belgian
cartoon character, but..uh...sounds like shit to me.
Max

Offline Chris Newall

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2010, 03:53:16 PM »
Was it the best cover version of Wide Open Road by a Texan band or simply the best cover version.
If you think it is the best cover version you should name the band and where you saw it.

Offline genkboy

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2010, 06:37:35 PM »
Some say he's the
younger brother of Tin Tin, an embittered, disolute Belgian cartoon character

Tintin really isn't that kind of guy, Max. That cartoon made my day when I was a teenager.
walls so thin I can almost hear them breathing

Offline son of albert

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  • ..the evenings were a kind of melancholy truce...
Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2010, 08:39:11 PM »
That's the kind of line you can imagine Orson Welles
saying during his bulky, tv commercial days.
  " Nashua; things are never going to be the same again but   
   then...
    (close up)they never were. (eye brows raise, eyes
     twinkle enigmatically.) CUT. PRINT.
 Orson: This is real shit, you know that?

Max

You're right! I can do shit. Like falling off a log. cf 1000 other posts.

It's an idea some day, in my tears, my dreams...

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2010, 08:44:05 PM »
Obviously Tintin isn't that kind of guy. It's Henri-Paul his
kid brother who is embittered and disolute. He's lived in
the shadow of his brother his whole life. I can't put myself
in his plus fours, it's not my life experience.
As for "I should tell..." Doc, the MD come cultural standover
is an interesting phenomonon in this town. I'm a keeper of
secrets not Keith 'Spanish Tony' Richards. And that's my most
important role.
I'll ask him but actually I made up the story about Cary Grant
though I could see such a situation arising. The second story is
clearly crap as a Belgian would do an even worse Texan accent than Tex Perkins. I'll suggest it to him but it's not everyone's
wet dream to be on this website. Believe it or not.
Human nature being what it is why are there no emoticons
with someone biting off another's ear or gouging out an eye?
But , to clarify my feelings, it's the best cover that I've ever heard. The only problem with the Triffids recorded output was
that it took place largely in the 1980s and the 'standard rock sound' was souless and repellent to my ear and stomach.
David said on a recently issued interview on this site that the only time he REALLY produced something was the B.E.S
sessions in London, with Kenny Davis Jr., Joanne Alich and
Rob Snarski and Kathy Weymess. On the 3rd disc there is
a version of Ocean of You, with a bass line that reminded me
that the Dave was in fact the best of all The Triffids Bass players and Dave singing, not Rob. If you want to hear how
spacious and tasteful Dave was as a producer without some NAME producer at the helm, listen to it. The Triffids made great records
IN SPITE of the prevailing trends not as a part of them.
Windbaggus Maxus

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2010, 08:58:07 PM »
Dear Son of Albert,
                            It's just the sort of line Mr. Welles might
have used himself in, say, 'F for Fake'. It's a fine line that
Rod Serling might have also used. It's just if one Googles
the U tube for Orson Welles frozen pea commercials one
sees a rather cantankerous version of the man we all love.
It's funny..sort of. There's also a couple of new Alan Partridge
sketches. Google 'Alan Partridge Mid Morning Matters'.
There's a 'Who do you think you are?' episode.
max

Offline vps

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2011, 10:08:01 PM »
fuel pointed this out to me and even though I think most of you have seen it already, it's worth posting for the sake of completeness:

Oh Mercy - 'Wide Open Road' NYC rooftop
Between thought and expression lies a lifetime

Offline Urpal

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2011, 11:39:29 PM »
Are these Oh Mercy videos some form of prayer? They seem to have an atmosphere of that to me. I mean that the player clearly has no audience and so the intention seems to be to make some form of incantation of the song to the ether.

Anyway, a rooftop scene against a backdrop of the cluttered, claustrophobic skyline of new New York seems an ideal setting for Wide Open Road.

Good job.

And thanks vps for bringing another episode to our attention.

Any more like this?
We all have our croissants to bear

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: Oh Mercy
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2011, 07:03:57 PM »
As you pointed out before they are really more cinematic
than musical. The versions aren't 'tour de forces' but gentle
versions of songs they/he feels a real familiarity with and I
would feel delighted if anything I wrote fell into that sort
of category. I think any songwriter would. There's a real
strange innocence about the performances which is very touching.
Max