Author Topic: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican  (Read 34358 times)

Offline syd hancock

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #120 on: April 16, 2010, 01:39:02 AM »
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triffidionalists

Gosh, that's good.  Thanks mark t.  Consider that stolen property now.

Oh, Gerooki, sorry about that.  I find that most alcohol accompanied evenings tend to include a discussion of the finer points of life, love & the human experience.

And porn ;)
How did you turn out to be so lightweight?

Offline Bro

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #121 on: April 16, 2010, 06:26:12 AM »
I hate this forum. Everytime I come up with some good point, someone else has already posted it. Sometimes twice, and much better put. Damn you all.     ;) 

But let me still add to the Mel Oxley debate. I thought both her traditional rendition of "I Want to Conquer You" and the more quirky "Embedded" were great - and those are two fave songs of mine. She understood when it was proper to stay close to the original and when it was possible to stray; "Embedded" is a non-linear song holding lots of possibilities for a good artist and she persued some of them with not a little success.

But I found her set at the Borderline supporting BSE rather flat and frankly just a bit boring. Yes, her voice was grand but the artist from the night before wasn't there. Or maybe it was the songs.

Offline buried-deep-in-love

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #122 on: April 16, 2010, 12:18:35 PM »
Hi this is my first post on here. I eventually made it to the Barbican, after nearly not being able to make it at all. I really, really enjoyed it, but my highlight of the night definately had to be Bury Me Deep in Love. This has always been one of my favourite Triffid's songs along side Beautiful Waste but I did not anticipate that I was going to enjoy someone else singing it as much as I did, in fact I can't stop listening to it (the version from Sydney on youtube)! I thought throughout the whole night there was a certain air of magic, but then again this was my first Triffids concert so I was totally in awe of the whole thing.

Offline manicpopthrills

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #123 on: April 16, 2010, 09:43:38 PM »
There's a few Barbican videos appearing on You Tube - apologies if this has been mentioned elsewhere. Started to watch Lonely Stretch and it just drove home the fact that I'm going to miss the show.

I'll go away and shut up now.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2010, 09:47:24 PM by manicpopthrills »

Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #124 on: April 22, 2010, 11:07:24 PM »
Not sure whether I'd seen this review posted before:

http://www.musicomh.com/music/gigs/triffids_0410.htm

The photo librarian has obviously dipped into the wrong file for the caption pic.
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Offline Sufferin Jukebox

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #125 on: April 29, 2010, 01:25:33 AM »
This might be a whole new thread but it did happen at the Barbican.

I was alone (with two tickets for company) in the foyer/ bar before the concert having a few Spitfires (in a real glass) and had little to do but relish the flavour of the hops and people watch. I began to marvel at  how all these people here in this room like the triffids too! You don't often find yourself in a place with so much in common with everyone but knowing no one.

But it hit me that everyone was:

Loosely speaking reasonably attractive.


Was I wearing rose (and alcohol) tinted spectacles?

Is it no suprise to those of you who have been to many Triffids gigs?

Is it to be expected that a small segment of the population with the good taste to like The Triffids would be generally "well preserved" or perhaps "well turned out"?






















Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #126 on: April 29, 2010, 02:13:58 AM »
But it hit me that everyone was loosely speaking reasonably attractive.

Was I wearing rose (and alcohol) tinted spectacles?

Is it no suprise to those of you who have been to many Triffids gigs?

Perhaps there was a preponderance of Australians at the Barbican gig after all?  :D

I have heard tell (I was only a babe at the time) that my Australian uncle, when he came to England with an unrealised hope of finding decent work in the Sixties, did complain that British people seemed less attractive per capita then than what he had been used to back home. Never having been to Australia, I couldn't make such a comparison. But certainly if you wander the streets UK-side these days the often drab appearance of the general population doesn't seem a marked improvememnt on the Sixties streetscene (to the extent I remember it) - though the loss of hair curlers and hats/headscarves may have helped a little on the females front. Of course, my uncle was only in England on account of courting an English lass who he ended up marrying. This fact undermines somewhat the veracity of his hypothesis. In fact, it might be suggested he was being something of a reverse stereotype - a "Whingeing Aussie". And, what's more, one over here stealing our girls! ;D

I jest. I still believe that the press suggestions I've read that the Barbican audience largely comprised Aussies was largely down to the usual journalistic laziness and "stereotyping" (i.e. the journalistic assumption that most Aussie bands are barely known outside of Australia unless they are now resident in the UK so most of their audience at a UK gig will inevitably be Australian ex-pats).

There may be something in your theory though, Sufferin. Not that I'm making any claims for myself, you understand, but most fans I've come across are bright, have style,  and are, in some sense, attractive.

Now don't start on me again, lonesome ;)
« Last Edit: April 29, 2010, 07:09:34 AM by Urpal »
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Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #127 on: April 29, 2010, 08:17:47 AM »
Just paid a visit to Tindersticks forum, where I am (and I know this sounds incredible) an occasional lurking passive member, although it seems to attract a good bunch of folks.


Some very nice things said there about the Barbican show - inevitably revolving quite a bit around Stuart Staples two songs, but generally getting an excellent overall review - and the thread contributors come acrosss as neither triffnerds nor Australian (though I haven't checked their passports).

Try this:

http://forum.tindersticks.co.uk/phorum/read.php?f=1&i=87806&t=87806
http://forum.tindersticks.co.uk/phorum/read.php?f=1&i=87907&t=87907

If it don't work then let me know and I'll copy and paste some stuff across.

Right, logged out and i don't think links will work so here is a flavour:

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Author: lara

The Triffids & guests at the Barbican

what a concert! that was probably what you'd call "good value for your money": 3 hours, 30+ songs, 2 encores and, at some point, as many as 11 people on stage. I really really enjoyed it! Great songs, very powerful stuff live. Lovely people from the original band, with nice stories to tell and old photos to show to the audience. Wonderful tribute to Dave McComb.

Stuart was visibly enjoying himself, he was the last guest on stage (which I thought was quite an honour for him), he sang two songs (only), including Wide Open Road (omg, he forgot the lyrics half way through but managed it in the end!). The little 'bar area' in the left corner of the stage was pretty nice. Stuart was there for some time, chatting with the likes of Mick Harvey. *coolness*

I spotted Neil in the audience, not very far from where I was sitting.

Who was that funny guy introducing the guests? He was THE BEST! :D

Quote
Author: loulou   

Hi Lara

didn't spot you or Ade,
but met Koen
and we bumped into Al
who now lives in Northern Spain

and had a nice chat with Simon Breed as well,
one of the guest singers
and someone who really deserves a wider audience
(i shall provide more info in days and weeks to come)

definitely a tour de force
don't know who the 'rascal' compere was
but he was entertaining alright

Quote
Author: koen


Yup, great concert. Stellar introductions to all the guests, Stuart was already grinning before the guy had even started his story about how he met him backstage whinge about f*cking Ausies coming to play in England.. hehe. The "We are the world" mood at the end with soap bubbles wasn't even out of place, somehow it all worked.

k.

Quote
Author: lara


Loulou, I was in the stalls at the front, in the middle of row H, with full view of the stage. I looked around but couldn't see you...

Al lives in Spain now? Hey, good for him! :)

Simon Breed is the very tall guy, right? I also thought he was amazing, great voice.

For the records, the other song Stuart sang was Save What You Can, the very last in the setlist, and it was a brilliant rendition! I was like "YES, that's my boy!", very proud of Stu. :-D

and those bubbles were very nice indeed :o)

Quote
Author: loulou
Date:   

yeah, i was a bit caught out with the 7.30 info on the ticket
didn't expect it to start then
and arrived about 15 mins after
(was on the right hand side stalls row p)

yes Simon Breed was the very tall nicely turned out bloke
and when he does his own material,
his beautiful voice gets even more expressive, even primal with emotion
(and he is working on some new solo material ... more when i have it)

Quote
Author: alfonso
 

The masterwork "Save What You Can" with mr Staples voice... I really NEED that recording!

Quote
Author: harry rag

Thought the show was amazing, 3 hours just flew by! Was in the middle of row F so you probably had to look past the back of my head, Lara!

Not sure Wide Open Road was a great choice for Stuart to sing but Save What You Can was certainly a triumph. I don't think he could hear himself too well at first as he took his earpiece monitor out during the 1st number and then put it back in during the 2nd.

I saw him outside the Barbican having a fag around 6.00, while I was trying to find somewhere to eat. I resisted the urge to ask him if he knew where Pizza Express was!

Quote
Author: aad

What a show. A three-hour set that was more like a memorial service for David McComb than a rock show. Stuart sang Wide Open Road (botched the words, recovered and scored the winner in injury time) and a magnificent version of Save What You Can. Other guests included Lightspeed Champion, Micj Harvey, Blackeyed Susans and more.

One of the nest songs of the night was Leaning, from the solo album, and they did Life of Crime, so I was happy.

Quote
Author: David

Save what you can - Glorious tune. That song was a staple of "Neighbours" 20 odd years ago as i recall and actually part of the plot as there was a pianist type charcter who had "written it" in the show.

Who had a shot at Stolen Property?

Mccombs solo album is a gen - true "Gospel music". One of my favourite gigs was his solo show when he toured that album - think he was dead a year or so later.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2010, 08:30:30 AM by Urpal »
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Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #128 on: May 06, 2010, 08:00:06 PM »
A few days after the Barbican gig I awoke with this strange thought on my mind (which seemed to come out of nowhere but the semi-conscious state I was in at the time): The Dev sung song "You Can Spend" that opened the show was the foundation upon which The Seabirds was subsequently built. The two are melodically and syncopatically (maybe that should read "syntactically"? Or maybe neither word exists, but I mean the way the rhythmic pattern of the words/melody are spread in certain areas of the two songs) linked somewhere along the line, though the connection is maybe not particularly obvious. It sounds unlikely but what do you think? Was this one of those odd half dream-state thoughts you have with little connection to reality or was I on the right side of consciousness at the time? I tested the theory by listening to the earlier song today and think there might be something in it anyway. You can listen to the song concerned on the Tape Six CD from the box set.

By the way, I thought Dev did the song really well and should consider making a hit of it.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 08:13:03 PM by Urpal »
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Offline glee

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #129 on: May 06, 2010, 09:13:07 PM »
Yes, I can see the connection. Great chords and melody in You Can Spend too. And I agree, Dev did a great job of it - as did Adrian in Athens.

Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #130 on: May 06, 2010, 09:31:28 PM »
Thanks. It's reassuring to hear I'm not entirely mad. Or, if I am, that I'm not alone :)
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Offline Chris Newall

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #131 on: May 07, 2010, 10:39:40 PM »
" You  Can Spend" is in turn derived from a song on Tape 4 called "Cyclone".
" I don't even have the courage to tell the truth but can't you see its not so cut and dry its sticky like glue"
David "cut and paste" bits from songs into new songs. I guess he must have liked them and wanted to use them again.

Offline Urpal

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Re: A Secret In The Shape Of A Song at The Barbican
« Reply #132 on: May 07, 2010, 11:42:30 PM »
Yeah, you hear a lot of that in the early tapes. "Dog's licking drips from a [garage] tap" appears somewhere pre-Life Of Crime and I've noticed a host of others. It's doubly interesting that the cut & paste applied not just to lyrics but to adapted forms of melodies and non-lyrical aspects of songs too.
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