Author Topic: The Black Swan  (Read 11406 times)

glee

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2007, 10:11:43 AM »
Re extra tracks, the answer, as followers of the re-issue programme could probably deduce from the general philosophy so far expressed, is yes.
Re Neighbours, sorry, I gave up watching a long time ago, before it tried to become gritty.

Offline LAMF

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2007, 07:42:27 PM »
Without wanting to give too much away, I was fortunate enough to get a listen to the expanded album it certainly is a different experience from the original album. The inclusion of the extra songs gave me a better indication of what the band was trying to do at the time, so the songs which originally stood out, like Butterflies Into Worms and Clown Prince certainly make enough sense when placed in context with the songs which were left unreleased or demoted to b-sides.
In the realm of the senseless....

Offline Eke

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2007, 07:56:48 PM »
Oh you tease... Roll on January, I say.

Offline The Black Death

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2008, 03:36:42 AM »
Can't understand the antipathy against this album from some quarters - the song writing is of an extremely high standard and it succeeds in every other area as well. Remember when this was released originally I think Rolling Stone gave it 4 out of 5 stars. .

It is superior to the over-produced Calenture in my opinion and is only a notch below BSD.

It is by any measure a great album - the reissue does it justice.

Offline peter70

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2008, 08:20:54 AM »
listening to the reissue Black Swan right now. Loved this album when it came out in 89 and even though the mixture of different styles was somewhat confusing at the time, it still has a certain European, 'Old-World' grandeur to my 'Old World'-ears.
Maybe that's what put people off at the time-they'd expected all this Australian Melodrama with David McComb as Perth's answer to Dostojevski or something intoning deep truths from the heart of some vast unimaginable desert with nothing but kangooroo bones and screaming guitars for company. Instead they got an album with  electronic stuff about getting drunk at house parties and tangoes (hang on-Argentina ain't Europe!)
I'm also struck with its nocturnal tone. Difficult to explain why it sounds that way-it just sounds best after a couple of glasses of absinthe at 1 in the morning, preferably outside a bar in Paris but it's chilly this time of year so I wrote this response instead.

Gotta say I seem to be Late-Period Triffids fan, it's the perfect follow-up to Calenture, an album that I probably would sleep with if records weren't so awkward to have around in bed.

And who the f- is some Dutch girl called Gabrielle?

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2009, 05:25:24 PM »
You probably know this but 'Goodbye Little Boy' was written
as the feminine response to Paul Kelly's 'To her door'. Also as
the Cliffe has become a celebrity itself, the photos for the cover
were taken in the delapidated stables at the back of the house
which once served as the venue for a gig featuring the senior
Perth punks like the Victims. Dave wrote a review of The Victims that appeared in RAM and was later reprinted on the
reissue of The Victims two 45s : "All loud on the Western front"
If you havent heard them they were an excellent group and to
my ears, better than Radio Birdman or X.
 Max                                                                                         P.S I don't drink alcohol as a rule but couldn't resist trying Absynthe which was served in a esoteric ritual involving flaming sugar cubes but apart from it's aniseed flavour I couldn't judge if the drink had a specific effect. Anyone experienced in driking the stuff?
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Offline peter70

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2009, 10:23:54 AM »
Drank absynthe on a couple of occasions and even bought an expensive bottle of the stuff once. Although it satisfies my need to feel like Arthur Rimbaud (eg someone else-anybody will do) on lonely Saturday nights, it tastes vile and gives me a sick stomach in the morning. The alcoholic content is like 69 percent I believe, but it's never made me experience any hallucinations - apparently it has a reputation for being hallucinogetic.  It does make you blind drunk. Not that any of this is relevant to a Triffids forum.

Offline son of albert

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  • ..the evenings were a kind of melancholy truce...
Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2009, 10:24:21 PM »
.................- apparently it has a reputation for being hallucinogetic.  It does make you blind drunk. Not that any of this is relevant to a Triffids forum.

You may want to peruse the forum a bit more P70..............you can learn a lot [how to roast a goose; the name of Karachi's only lap steel shop; the death of Tony Hancock and so on] and much of it knack all to do with the Triffids. I'm sure there's a link between the eclecticism of TBS and the forum if you want a tangential connection..........
It's an idea some day, in my tears, my dreams...

Offline Max Dembo

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Re: The Black Swan
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2009, 08:40:45 AM »
Well put S.O.A, besides anything alcohol or rider related is pretty relevent. I believe the hallucinogenic properties of Absynthe was due to the presence of Wormwood, which is no
longer used. It's poisonous and will get one blind drunk in a
more literal sense.
In reference to your feeling that TBS is a 'night time' record I
read that Bob Dylan has a rule of only recording at night when
one can more easily accomodate certain darker qualities of tone & tempo.
max